B/S/T Part 4: Beyond Facebook

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B/S/T Part 4: Beyond Facebook

Click here to visit Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

There are dozens of ways you can make a profit on old children’s clothes.  Facebook happens to be my favorite, because there are no fees involved (other than a nominal PayPal fee when you invoice).  However, selling in Facebook groups means a smaller audience.  If you’ve tried to sell your items on Facebook and still have clothes left over, it’s time to try one of the many other resources for selling unwanted children’s clothes, shoes, and accessories.

1. eBay

Pros:

With over 165 million users worldwide, you’re bound to find someone on eBay who wants to buy your items.  Seriously, I’ve sold things I would normally have thrown away.  You can sell ANYTHING on eBay.  Signing up is easy, and while fees vary, as long as you’re selling fewer than 50 items per month, you won’t have to pay anything to list your item.  Listing is highly customizable, and you can decide whether you want to place an item up for auction (recommended for more popular brands) or determine a fixed price for your item.  You can also allow your buyers to make offers.  eBay has an app which makes buying and selling from your smartphone a breeze.

Cons:

Selling fees can be steep.  They vary, but you can expect to pay around 10% of the sale price back to eBay.  Also, since eBay has so many users, it’s not uncommon to deal with difficult buyers.  Make sure you are very specific in your listing and disclose all flaws to avoid problems later.  

 

2.  Poshmark

Pros:

The Poshmark app is very easy to use and is more interactive than eBay.  Think of it as social media specifically for buying and selling fashion.  You have options to share other user’s listings, follow other users, and join “parties” where you can advertise specific items.  Buyers can make offers on any item for sale, so prices are always negotiable.  As a buyer, I've snagged some FANTASTIC deals by using that "offer" button.  Sign up here using code NVQHB to save $5 off your first purchase.

Cons:

While Poshmark is a place to buy and sell all clothing and accessories, it’s mostly for women’s fashion, so your pool of buyers for children’s clothing may be smaller.  The shipping and fees are fairly hefty, so if you’re selling smaller items (like children’s clothes), your profits will be slim.

 

3.  Kidizen

Pros:

An app specifically for buying and selling children’s clothes, shoes, and accessories, you will find your target audience on Kidizen.  As a buyer, prices are usually pretty reasonable, though.  Sign up here using code ayn7r to get $5 off your first purchase.

Cons:

At 18%, Kidizen’s fees are high.  I also find the app somewhat difficult to use as a seller.

 

4. ThredUp

Pros:

ThredUp does all of the work for you when it comes to selling.  You request a “Clean Out Bag” and put your unwanted items in there.  Send it back to ThredUp and they will pay you outright for high-demand items, and consign the remainder of accepted items.  Sign up here to get $10 off your first purchase.

Cons:

You have much less control over your items than you would from the other options.  ThredUp determines pricing, and can even reject some of the items you’ve sent in.  If you want them to return unaccepted items, you have to pay a hefty shipping fee.

 

5. Consignment

Pros:

You probably have a children’s consignment shop nearby, so the only work you have to do is bringing your unwanted items to the store.  It’s a good option for items you haven’t been able to sell online.  

Cons:

Consignment shops are a “middle man,” so they’re going to pay you less because they still need to make a profit off the buyer.  They also may reject some of the clothes you bring in.

 

6.  Garage Sale

Pros:

Children’s clothes are a hot seller at garage sales.  You’re also helping local mamas buy affordable clothes for their kids.

Cons:

Organizing a garage sale is a huge pain, and garage sale prices aren’t going to put a ton of money in your pocket.

 

7.  Get Crafty

Tried to sell and you still have a bunch of old clothes on your hands?  Repurpose them!  You can make everything from blankets, to stuffed animals, to art with old baby clothes.  Check out a bunch of fun ideas here.  

 

8.  Donation

Obviously, this isn’t going to earn you a profit, but donating gently used children’s clothes is always appreciated.  Rather than dropping off a bag at Goodwill, see if you can find a local family in need to whom you can give directly.  Women’s shelters are another good option for helping families who need it most.

 

Thanks so much for checking out my B/S/T series!  As always, I’d love to hear your questions and feedback in the comments!